Homework


Purpose of Homework

Homework is work that is set to be done outside the timetabled curriculum, it contains an element of independent study and should be designed in a way that allows completion without the direct supervision of an adult. It is important in consolidating prior learning, preparing for new learning and raising student achievement.

 

Homework enables students to:

•Develop their literacy skills including greater exposure to reading.
•Retrieve previously studied topics and utilise the testing effect to reinforce long term memory of the vital knowledge and skills.
•Prepare for new learning activities, by introducing fundamental concepts from an upcoming topic or retrieving prerequisite material from prior topics.
•Develop their ability to work independently.
•Build an understanding of their abilities and develop metacognitive strategies.
•Build student confidence and expand opportunities for success which in turn can positively impact on student resilience.
•Develop student ownership and responsibility for learning.
•Although homework will be set that does not require adult supervision regular homework can engage parental co-operation and support.

 

Homework will be set in a number of different forms in order to match the needs of the individual curriculum area and provide greatest opportunity for meaningful home study.

The key homework strategies we use are listed below.

 

Digital homework

•Use of online packages such as Hegarty Maths, Bedrock and Seneca leaning.
•Use of Microsoft forms, set through Microsoft teams.
•Use of our online library service where reading is set as part of the homework.
 

Written homework

•Self-quizzing using knowledge organisers and homework books.
•Extended writing
•Exam style questions
•Key vocabulary practice
•Knowledge Quizzes
 

For the links to our online platforms, click here.

Key Responsibilities 

 

The role of the student

•To listen to the homework instruction in class
•To make sure they understand the homework instructions and the deadline date.
•To ensure the homework is completed and handed in to meet the deadline.
•To attempt all work given and give their best
•To inform the class teacher of any difficulties prior to the homework deadline date. 
 

The role of the class teacher

•Set homework so that students are set work at the agreed frequency.
•Set homework instructions in Arbor so it is visible in the parent app.
•Set ‘hand in’ deadlines that support curriculum progression by linking to current/previous learning.
•Record homework submission in Arbor so that parents are aware whether their child has completed the work by the given deadline.
•Provide help and support for those students seeking it.
 

The role of the guardian

•Check the Arbor app so that you know what homework has been set.
•Help your child or children to build the completion of homework into their daily routines.
•Contact your child’s teacher if any issues arise so that we can help you to resolve these.
•Encourage your child to complete homework and praise them when they do.

Homework Frequency 

Below is a list of the agreed frequncies at which homework will be set...

Subject/s

Phase

Frequency

Maths/English/Science

KS3

One piece of homework per week

KS4

One piece of homework per week

Humanities

KS3

One piece of homework per fortnight

KS4

One piece of homework per week

Technologies

KS3

One piece of homework per fortnight

KS4

One piece per of homework week

Languages

KS3

One piece of homework per fortnight

KS4

One piece per of homework week

Creative arts

KS3

One piece of homework per fortnight

KS4

One piece per of homework week

Performing arts

KS3

One piece of homework per fortnight

KS4

One piece per of homework week

PE

KS3

One piece of homework per fortnight

KS4

One piece per of homework week

Health and Social Care

 

 

 

At least once per fortnight but frequency may increase in line with assignment progress

KS4

Child Development

 

KS4

Travel and Tourism

 

KS4

  • What is Self-Quizzing and why is it important?

    First of all, self-quizzing is a skill which needs to be developed. Whereas some students will find the process natural and take to it straight away, others will need to practice and develop the techniques needed to get the most out of self-quizzing.

    Self-quizzing is, as the name suggests, a method of homework where students learn to test themselves on the key knowledge and concepts they need in order to be successful at school. A large amount of research has been done on the subject, concluding that students who master and regularly use self-quizzing make significantly more progress than those who don’t.

    Students who test themselves with a quiz after studying a topic, are shown to be able to retain that knowledge for a much longer time than those students who simply re-study or re-read the material. When students quiz themselves on the knowledge they have learnt, studies suggest that much more of the information is stored in their long-term memory. In a world where students are expected to remember information for years before they sit their GCSE exams, the long-term memory is vital to success.

  • How do students self-quiz?

    One of the other advantages of self-quizzing is its simplicity. All it requires is access to the key knowledge, which, as mentioned earlier, is provided in our Knowledge Organisers.

    1. First students read the key pieces of knowledge that have been identified by their teachers.
    2. After they have done this a few times so that they are comfortable with information, they should cover it and close their Knowledge Organiser.
    3. Next, using their self-quizzing book, they should write down as much of the knowledge as they can, entirely from memory, they should not look at the Knowledge Organiser at this point. The key tactic with self-quizzing is to practise getting the knowledge out of their heads and onto the page, the more they practice, the easier it is to access the information stored in their memory.
    4. Once they have written all they can remember, they should reopen the Knowledge Organiser and check their answers. This will provide the important feedback that they need to judge their accuracy.
    5. The students should correct their mistakes and add any missing information to their answers.

    With more practice the better they will get and the more they will learn.

  • How can you help your child?

    Another benefit of self-quizzing and the carefully designed Knowledge Organiser is that it is easy for family to get involved and help our students. Unlike with some other forms of homework, where some form of subject knowledge may be needed to help our students, all of the answers are already provided. So, you could pick up the Knowledge Organiser and ask students to give you key definitions, or spell certain words. You could create questions based on the information or even describe a diagram and ask them to accurately recreate it. Self-quizzing allows others to be part of students’ learning, both at school and at home.

  • What other forms of homework do we do?

    Although the benefits of self-quizzing are there for all to see, we don’t want to put all of our eggs in one basket and, of course, we want to add some variety for our students to maintain their enthusiasm and drive to complete homework to the best of their ability. Below is a list of other methods of homework that your child will receive from school.

    1. Online learning platforms, such as Hegarty Maths, Seneca Learning or Sparx (year 7 maths.
    2. Past examination questions. These are used mainly for Key Stage 4 students and help them to prepare for the style of questions they will face in their final exams.
    3. Extended writing questions. Some subjects require students to develop their extended writing skills in order to fully explain their answers to longer questions.
    4. Reading. The benefits of reading cannot be understated. Today’s exams require higher reading ages than ever so, having the comprehension skills to decipher what the question is actually asking, is vital. Exposing our students to regular reading improves their vocabulary and, with it, their understanding of more complex concepts.

    As with everything in a child’s education, the more we can work together as unit, child-home-school, the more they benefit, not only gaining greater knowledge and understanding but also reinforcing the skills and characteristics they will need to successful in the years beyond school.